St Helena Online

Tag: Simon Pipe

Listen online: what slave graves mean for St Helena

Photo montage showing map extract, drawing of slave camp, and surviving slaves, overlaid with excavation earth
The liberated African depot, and survivors who stayed on the island. Montage by Simon Pipe

If you missed Saint FM’s broacasts on the excavation of 300 human skeletons on St Helena, don’t worry: the programmes are still available as two podcasts on St Helena Online. 

The discoveries in Rupert’s Valley in 2008 brought new insight into the horrors aboard slave-running “pirate” ships in the 19th Century.

An archaeologist works on one of only five coffin burials found

The skeletons were those of Africans who were liberated on St Helena when captured slave vessels were brought to the island. Over more than two decades, 26,000 people arrived, many dead or dying. It is thought 5,000 were buried in the desolation of Rupert’s Valley.

Some 500 of the survivors stayed on the island, but lived apart, speaking their own languages. Traces of them vanish in the records.

The lead archaeologist, Dr Andy Pearson – who is returning to the island to catalogue its archives – says he has spoken to older St Helenians whose grandparents were alive at the time of the slave liberations, and who remember the tales they told. “We are within historical touching distance,” he says in the second podcast.

The first podcast, Human Traffic, the story behind the discoveries, and the effects on the team of “coming face to face with victims of slavery.”

The second, Saints and Slaves, examines what the finds mean for the island and its people. As former governor Andrew Gurr says, the history of slavery remains an international story, “and St Helena is right at the heart of it.”

They are based on interviews recorded by former BBC journalist Simon Pipe, editor of St Helena Online. They feature Pamela Ward Pearce and Colin Fox of the Friends of St Helena, as well as members of the archaeology team.

Read more here.

Click here to listen live to Saint FM.

Ann's Place, sketch

St Helena Online is six months old. Happy reading

by Simon Pipe, editor

St Helena Online is six months old today – 20 July 2012. Although a couple of features were posted on the site at the back end of 2011, it was not until January that it became properly active.

Ann's Place, sketch
The first post: Ann’s Place

One day, a yachtie’s drawing of Ann’s Place in Jamestown popped up on the internet, and it became the subject of the first post of just over 350 that have been published this year. I’m still a little way off my millionth hit.

Initially the site was intended as an exercise in blogging as part of a master’s degree course at Coventry University, but it developed into a full-blown news website, now partnered with – but not part of – the St Helena Independent.

Today, I enrol on Birmingham City University’s online journalism course in order to use the site as my final MA project, and keep it going for a few more weeks – which, regrettably, I wasn’t able to do at Coventry.

Part of the project will be to attempt to find a way to make the site “sustainable”. It will never make money. The likelihood is that it will not be viable to continue it in its present form after I submit my work for final assessment in mid-September. At the Indy, editor Mike knows there will not be so many stories for the paper each week from then.

I hope to find a justification for keeping the site going in some form, probably with occasional articles. It could even become a project for another journalism student.

In the meantime, it’ll go quiet for the next few days. I’m off camping. Please enjoy reading the site… while you can.

I’d like to thank the many people who have given practical help or shared their wisdom, of which there has been much. It is an exciting time to be writing about St Helena – even from 5,000 miles away. Best wishes…

SEE ALSO:
Ann’s Place – a sketch

St Helena Online is almost back to normal

St Helena continues to generate far more stories than one journalist (in the UK) can keep up with. The quota of news per head of population must be among the highest in the world. It doesn’t help that a technical problem has blighted this news website, and personal life has got in the way as well (taking my daughter to her first university open day).

A backlog of stories will be cleared as soon as possible, including the third part of Andrew Gurr’s reflections on his four years as St Helena’s immediate past governor. It is hoped the results of this week’s by-election on the island, and a public meeting about a shortage of teachers at Prince Andrew School, will be published by Thursday morning.

Thank you for bearing with it.

Simon Pipe
Editor, St Helena Online

 

Independent closure claims dismissed as ‘nonsense’ – but new book foresaw what would happen

Allegations that St Helena Government brought about the closure of the island’s only privately-run newspaper have been strongly refuted.

Cover of book "What Do We Mean By Local?"
BROUGHT TO BOOK: Islands chapter said losing adverts would kill the Independent

In a second statement on the affair, the government says its plans to help set up a state-funded rival “did not include any intention to see the Independent newspaper close down and it is nonsense to suggest this.”

But the threat to the St Helena Independent was foreseen in a book published only three days before the paper’s final edition appeared. It said withdrawing advertising – as the government has now done – would almost certainly kill off the Independent.

The government decided to switch its advertising from the Independent to the state-funded Sentinel, which was published for the first time on 29 March 2012. The  Independent put out a farewell issue on March 30.

SHG also decided not to renew a “service” contract with Saint FM, the Independent’s sister radio station – though owner Mike Olsson says this contract did not relate to the newspaper.

In the book, contributor Simon Pipe – editor of this website – referred to a new law that could force the closure of a newspaper.

“In Britain,” it said, “MPs and media commentators have recognised that legal regulation of the Press raises difficult issues. Actually closing down a newspaper would be pretty well unthinkable.

“Not on St Helena. The Media Standards Ordinance 2011 allows the St Helena Government to “terminate production” of any newspaper that is deemed by a Media Commission to have breached editorial codes on harmful, offensive or defamatory content.

“In reality, the power to close down a newspaper is not needed. The government can simply withdraw its advertising, which almost certainly would have the same effect.”

Click here for an extract from Media on Remote Islands book chapter

In an interview on Saint FM, Mike Olsson said that former governor Andrew Gurr had advised him to accept a buy-out offer from the new media organisation “or they are going to run right over you.”

The government’s new statement was issued amid ongoing disquiet over the way in which the new media organisation came into being. It said much of the comment on the issue had been distorted.

It began by praising the Independent’s “contribution to stimulating debate and comment on St Helena.”

It said councillors had approved the setting-up of the new community-owned media service – known as the St Helena Broadcasting (Guarantee) Corporation.

And it said it “could not continue to pay SHMP (the Independent and Saint FM) a very substantial sum each month to air certain material, under the terms of an arrangement made in 2009.”

The government said it had been paying Mr Olsson’s company an average of £1,690 each month, plus “many thousands of pounds” for advertising. It had also been funding the St Helena Herald, which closed in March 2012, and Radio St Helena, which is expected to be replaced by three new stations in the summer.

“This level of financial exposure could not continue indefinitely,” it said, but “SHG considered that it had a responsibility to ensure that Saints were served by a high quality and independent media, with less Government subsidy.”

The new media organisation aims to become self-supporting “in the short to medium term” – depending on how quickly the island’s economy grows, with an airport expected to bring tourism cash from 2015.

Mike Olsson challenged the government version of events in a statement, and in an interview on Saint FM with presenter Vince Thompson – who had also been a columnist on the Independent.

He said the contract with the government was not a subsidy, but involved a payment for services – including broadcasting to Saints overseas, and being able to broadcast emergency announcements within five minutes at any time of day or night.

He also said that the contract did not relate to the Independent, which survived on income from advertising and sales alone.

He also complained that he had not been allowed to see a report by former official John Styles, outlining his ideas for the new rival, “Like we are not stakeholders in the media at all in St Helena.

“The next thing I saw was Mr John Styles in my living room saying, ‘Can we send in
Cable & Wireless to value your equipment?’ He was shown the door quite quickly.”

A third source has said that Mr Olsson refused to consider “generous” offers to buy him out.

Mr Thompson also questioned the validity of claims that the new media service would be financially “sustainable” if it did not have to repay start-up funding – including the cost of refurbishing its new base in the Castle Gardens.

Full details of the financial arrangement between SHBC and the government have not been released.

But Mr Olsson attacked the government for publishing details of its payments to Saint FM. “What would normally be classified as ‘commercial-in-confidence’ has been dragged out in the public domain,” he said in a statement.

He also referred to a 2007 audit report, which he said established the principle that “as a subsidised organisation you cannot go out and compete with the private sector.”

That was the basis on which The Sentinel’s forerunner, the St Helena Herald, was banned from accepting paid advertising – which made it impossible to generate income it needed on top of its government funding.

  • Simon Pipe contributed a chapter on media on remote islands to an academic book about the state of local journalism. What Do We Mean By Local? Grass-Roots Journalism – Its Death and Rebirth, is published by Abramis, price £17.95. www.abramis.co.uk.

READ MORE IN THE MEDIA SECTION OF THIS WEBSITE

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