St Helena Online

Tag: wind turbines

More megawatts on the way to backup the existing wind farm

by Guy Gatien

Wind Energy Solutions (WES) has announced that it has received an order from the Government of St Helena for delivery and installation of six additional WES80 Hybrid turbines.

WES 80 Wind Turbine
WES 80 Wind Turbine

With the installation of the six new turbines St Helena will double its existing wind energy capacity. The six new WES turbines plus the wind turbines already installed on St Helena will provide a total of 20% of the energy needs of the island. With this much production, we will have to wait and see if the Saints get a break on electric costs, or…

The St Helena Government in June of 2012 said the existing turbines on Deadwood Plain help keep down the extremely high cost of electricity, which is subsidised at a cost of about £1.5 million a year. Even so, at up to 36 pence a unit, the island rates are thought to be among the highest in the world.

In California near where I live is the earliest wind farm’s in the United States. The Altamont Pass Wind Farm is still the largest concentration of wind turbines in the world, with a capacity of 576 megawatts (MW), producing about 125 MW on average and 1.1 terawatt-hours (TWh) yearly. It contains 4930 turbines.  One megawatt typically powers about 750 US homes.  All this capacity and technology comes with a high non-monetary cost as well. We will look into those costs next time the wind blows by.

Read More:
WES80 Turbine
WindTech International

Extra turbines are in the wind across island (comments added)

Track across Deadwood Plain, passing between turbines
Deadwood Plain (picture: John Grimshaw)

Go-ahead has been given for six new wind turbines to be erected on St Helena – with sites for more being considered on other parts of the island.

St Helena Government says the existing turbines on Deadwood Plain help keep  down the extremely high cost of electricity, which is subsidised at a cost of about £1.5 million a year. Even so, at up to 36 pence a unit, the island rates are thought to be among the highest in the world.

Members of the island’s planning board were briefed about the possible new turbines when deciding whether to allow six extra turbines at Deadwood Plain.

They approved the six, which are to be the same type as those already there.

A second substation will be built to regulate the supply of electricity sent via underground cables to the power station in Rupert’s Valley.

Read Vince Thompson’s report in this Friday’s St Helena Independent

Board members heard investigations were under way to choose sites for more turbines elsewhere on the island, but there was not enough information yet to say what sites might be suitable.

In March, St Helena Government said that the existing turbines had helped save about £250,000 in diesel costs. Without the turbines, it said, electricity would cost an extra 3.3p per unit.

Prices went up from 1 April 2012.

(This story has been updated to correct a statement that further turbines would bring prices down. Though this may be true, its inclusion was an error of interpretation).

COMMENTS:

Why is nobody using wave power there? An island in the middle of the ocean should have some waves.

– Amy DuPrez, via Facebook

Hydro-thermal may be an option too, and is much less unsightly than wave machines or turbines

– Michael Richards, via Facebook

LINK:
Electricity tariffs – St Helena Government press release

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