St Helena Online

Tag: NP Glory 4

Time-lapse videos recall historic landing

Screen Shot 2014-01-23 at 12.06.06Look back to a key moment in St Helena’s airport project by watching two time-lapse videos of the NP Glory 4 becoming the first ocean-going ship ever to dock on the island, in July 2012.

The first, by Scott Stander, shows the vessel being manoeuvred into position, bow-first, and the first construction vehicles being unloaded: all condensed into 53 seconds. Watch it here.

The second, much-longer video, shot by an unnamed Saint, shows the various movements of vehicles and workers. See it here.

Another video by the same Saint producer shows one of the biggest explosions on the airport construction site on Prosperous Bay Plain. See it here.

SEE ALSO: After the nerves, praise for successful docking

Rough seas force airport ship to sit at anchor

Words and pictures by Bruce Salt

St Helena’s airport supply ship, the NP Glory 4, has had to retreat from her mooring in Ruperts Bay after sea conditions deteriorated on Friday 1 March 2013.

Today (Monday), the ship remained at anchor as the rough sea continued.

NP Glory 4 at anchor
NP Glory 4 at anchor

Even though the 78-metre-long vessel was moored to the shore in Ruperts soon after daybreak on Friday, it was advised that the NP Glory 4 should retreat to seaward by 13:00hrs as it was feared the sea would get rougher than it already was.

With noon just past, the starboard bow mooring line “popped”, indicating that it was time to abort to an anchorage off Mundens Point and await calmer weather.

Containers and machinery remained aboard the roll-on, roll-off ship.

On all of the vessel’s previous visits the sea has been flat calm. This had to happen soon or later.

The RMS St Helena arrived around 09:40 on Monday 4 March and passenger disembarkation and cargo removal was soon under way.

The local coxswains are particularly skilled at operating in rough conditions.

SEE ALSO: 
After the nerves, praise all round for successful docking
Basil Read ship: the pictures that made Johnny homesick

ALSO BY BRUCE SALT: 
GALLERY: The wreck of the Queequeg

A man in the bow of the ship gives directions as a vehicle rolls down the ramp

After the nerves, praise all round for successful docking

A man in the bow of the ship gives directions as a vehicle rolls down the ramp
Lines hold the NP Glory 4 in place as her ramp drops. Picture courtesy of St Helena Airport Project

Islanders involved in the first ever docking of a ship at St Helena have been praised for making it go smoothly.

A fault with a flow meter meant the discharge of fuel had to be halted overnight, meaning the NP Glory 4 was delayed in returning to Namibia to collect more materials for the island’s airport project.

One senior member of the Basil Read airport team had admitted that people were nervous about how the docking on Wednesday 11 July would go.

“Obviously there is a great deal to be considered and we would not be telling the truth if we were not nervous but we have anticipated as many risks and remedies as we possibly can.”

Some railings on the temporary jetty in Rupert’s Bay were damaged, but they are only needed for public protection when the jetty is not in use, so they will be replaced with a removable waterside barrier.

Head and shoulders shot of Deon de Jager
HAPPY: Deon de Jager

Dean de Jager, Basil Read’s island director, was interviewed by Saint FM the day after the docking.

He said: “Except for the fuel pumping, I would give it nine and a half out of ten. All operations went very slick. The first voyage is behind us and we can look forward to the coming voyages but I’m very happy with what happened.

“Everything is a learning process, but we are on schedule. We would have liked to send it back earlier, but… things happen.”

He praised the way people made the operation go as smoothly as possible. “Everyone on this side – St Helena Government, all their departments, immigration, customs, the access office, the police – I could not have asked for better flow on the day. They all did their bit and I need to thank them.

“To my team as well, the Basil Read guys, yesterday was once again proof I have chosen the right people. They are a practical bunch, they make a plan and they can work well together as a team.”

SEE ALSO:
Basil Read ship: the pictures that made Johnny homesick
In pictures: airport ship is first to dock at St Helena
Basil Read ship arrives off Jamestown

LINK
St Helena Airport Project – picture gallery

Picture taken from high ground, showing ship from above, with bow and stern ropes splayed out in all directions.

Basil Read ship: the pictures that made Johnny homesick

Picture taken from high ground, showing ship from above, with bow and stern ropes splayed out in all directions. This photograph of the NP Glory 4 – the first ship ever to dock at St Helena – was taken from the side of the new airport haul road on the Pipe Ridge. It appears on the St Helena Community website, here, along with several other photographs.

UK-based webmaster Johnny Clingham said: “I feel homesick now, and feel jealous missing all the action as it unfolds.”

The ship was not as stable in the water as the RMS St Helena, according to Captain Bill Langworthy, who accompanied the voyage. “It rolled quite considerably on the way here but it can do everything we want it to do.”

On the historic day, though, the crew were blessed with a very calm sea.

Ralph Peters broadcast live from Rupert’s Bay as the ship docked at eight minutes to eight on the morning of Wednesday, 11 July 2012, loaded with vehicles and fuel needed by airport contractor Basil Read.

Ralph commentated as the ship nosed towards the jetty, then cut its engines as two heavy ropes, either side of the bow, were secured on bollards and slowly winched tight.

The island harbourmaster said: “It’s a magnificent job. We have had ships come close but this is the first time to come actually up to the jetty.”

It had taken 510 years, from the island’s discovery, for a ship to come alongside – unless one counts the captured slave-running vessels that were brought ashore in this same bay. But unlike the NP Glory 4, they never went to sea again.

Janet Lawrence, who heads the air access office, said: “Finally it’s here: it’s happened. Everybody in Basil Read is just as excited as we are.”

The first vehicle off the vessel was a Volvo grader. The most important, though, may well be a 70-tonne excavator.

Its first job, once it has been reassembled, will be to cut a way through the rock in the way of the final section of the 14-kilometre haul road to the airport site at Prosperous Bay Plain.

It is expected to be as long as two weeks before the road is finally open and the newly-unloaded construction vehicles can leave Rupert’s Valley.

  • Ralph Peters: “We still haven’t worked out what the ‘NP’ stands for in ‘NP Glory 4’. I remember Janet saying, ‘Not Present’… but it’s present now.”

SEE ALSO:
In pictures: airport ship is first to dock at St Helena
Basil Read ship arrives off Jamestown

LINK
St Helena Airport Project – picture gallery

All secure: airport ship is first to dock at St Helena

The NP Glory 4 has become the first ship ever to dock at St Helena. The ocean-going landing craft dropped her bow ramp on to the new jetty at Rupert’s Bay shortly after 08:00 local time on Wednesday, 11 July 2012.

First to come off were several heavy construction vehicles that had been secured on the deck of the vessel – nicknamed the Basil Read ship, after the airport construction company that has chartered her for the duration of the island’s airport project.

Click on the pictures to see them full-size. The St Helena Community website has some excellent shots looking down on operations, here. A gallery of pictures of the ship sweeping into James Bay has also been published on the St Helena Air Access website, here.

SEE ALSO:
Basil Read ship arrives off Jamestown
St Helena’s airport supply ship, en route to a place in history
Airport supply ship set to make island history

Basil Read ship arrives off Jamestown

The Basil Read ship at anchor, with local boats in the foreground of the picture
The Basil Read ship has brought construction equipment for the airport project.

The supply ship for St Helena’s airport project has arrived off the island for the first of what promise to be many visits.

The NP Glory 4 turns into James Bay, dwarfed by the scale of cliffs
HARD TO PORT: NP Glory 4 turns into James Bay

A gallery of pictures of the ship sweeping into James Bay has been published on the St Helena Air Access website, here. It will be updated as unloading progresses.

Members of the crew of the NP Glory 4 – known as the Basil Read ship, after the airport contractor – went ashore soon after arrival in James Bay.

On Wednesday, 11 July 2012, the ship is due to become the first ever to dock at the island.

SEE ALSO:
St Helena’s airport supply ship, en route to a place in history
Airport supply ship set to make island history

St Helena’s airport supply ship, en route to a place in history

Basil Read ship alongside in Cape town with Table mountain behindThe Basil Read ship, NP Glory 4, pictured in Cape Town shortly before making its historic first voyage to St Helena, laden with equipment and materials for building the island’s airport. It was arrived off Rupert’s Bay today, and is due to berth at a new jetty tomorrow – the first cargo ship to dock at St Helena in the island’s history. Watch this site for updates. (Picture courtesy of Basil Read)

SEE ALSO:
Airport supply ship set to make island history

Airport supply ship set to make island history

The Basil Read ship, being loaded at Walvis Bay

History is set to be made on St Helena this Wednesday, when the Basil Read supply ship is due to be become the first cargo vessel ever to dock at the island.

The finishing touches have been applied to a temporary jetty in Rupert’s Bay and three vast pneumatic fenders have been delivered to the island in readiness for the berthing of the NP Glory 4.

The ship is 78 metres long and has a draught of 3.5 metres when fully laden, and is technically classed as a landing craft. She will bring all the raw materials needed for construction of the island’s first airport.

Most of Rupert’s Valley will be closed to visitors but islanders will be able to board buses down to the waterside, allowing them to spend up to 20 minutes viewing operations.

Large fender covered in tyres, pictured on shore
Three pneumatic fenders will cushion the Basil Read ship against the new jetty

The ship departed Walvis Bay on 4 July, with 17 crew, plus Captain Bill Langworthy – a familiar name on St Helena from his time with Andrew Weir Shipping, the company that manages the RMS St Helena.

She is expected to reach St Helena on the afternoon of Tuesday, carrying various construction vehicles, including a bus, a 60-tonne mobile crane and a 70 tonne excavator.

She is then expected to be anchored in Ruperts Bay while the captain assesses local sea conditions, and then berth on Wednesday.

She will remain alongside during daylight hours but will return to her anchorage out in Ruperts Bay between approximately 6pm and 6am.

Yellow vehicle with catarpillar tracks
This 70-tonne excavator will trundle up the airport haul road

The vessel is expected to remain in Ruperts Bay for three days, and then commence a regular 22-day cycle of round trips between St Helena and Walvis Bay.

While she is in port, Lower Ruperts will be closed from the junction near St Michael’s Church.

Bus trips will run on Wednesday between 9am and 1pm from St Michael’s.

Mundens path will also be closed throughout this period

Ruperts residents, businesses and emergency vehicles will still be permitted access to Lower Ruperts at all times.

LINK:
First of the excavation equipment moves to Prosperous Bay Plain – St Helena Community website
NP Glory 4 – Basil Read ship

Facebook