St Helena Online

Tag: Graham Doig

Graham returns to help sort water supply problems

Click the pic to see full drought coverage
Click the pic to see full drought coverage

Water consultant Graham Doig will return to St Helena in early July 2013 – but his main job will not involve tackling the island’s severe shortage of supplies.

St Helena Government has revealed details of his visit in response to a report that the island does have enough water, despite the current drought – but not necessarily where it’s needed.

His prime tasks are to prepare the island’s treatment works for upgrading. His visit is part of a programme that also includes ending the supply of untreated water to some homes.

The Castle said: “Graham Doig of Fairhurst is next coming to St Helena on 3 July 2013. He will ensure that essential works are carried out to the four water treatment works in advance of the refurbishment contractor arriving on island in September.

“The water infrastructure project includes for the supply of treated water to all communities.

Hutts Gate treatment works. Picture: Neil George
Hutts Gate treatment works. Picture: Neil George

“There is an infrastructure programme that includes water projects. It is a rolling programme spread over several years.

“The issue of water not being where it is needed is being addressed by looking holistically at the problem.

“One solution is to drill deep boreholes, but with the volcanic origins of the island it is difficult to predict where underground water might be found. There have been successes in this approach but a final decision has not been taken.

“We are in the information-gathering phase at the moment and once sufficient information has been gathered, the Water Resource Plan will be finalised and agreed with St Helena Government.

“The current plan is to supply Sandy Bay from the refurbished Levelwood water treatment works.

“The Woody Ridge area will be supplied from a refurbished Hutt’s Gate water treatment works.

“Plans are not yet finalised for supplying treated water to the Blue Hill distribution area.”

  • graham-doig-180Graham may or may not have the gift of making water run uphill, but he’s a top performer when it comes to running uphill himself. In January 2013, he set a new record for ascending the 699 brutal steps of Jacob’s Ladder. Sadly, he will arrive on the island just too late to take part in the 2013 St Helena Festival of Running.

SEE ALSO:
Drought gallery
Expert says St Helena has ‘enough water’ – in the wrong place
Graham beats Jacob’s Ladder record – hands down

Graham beats Jacob’s Ladder record – hands down

picture by Tina Yon-Stevens, St Helena
I’ll crawl if I have to: Graham Doig sets a new Jacob’s Ladder record. Picture by Tina Yon-Stevens

The record for climbing Jacob’s Ladder has been broken by less than a second – by a “runner” who went up on all fours.

Graham Doig cleared the 699th step of the St Helena landmark in a time of 5 minutes, 16.78 seconds, using feet and hands. Then he rolled on to the ground at the feet of spectators.

copyright: Tiny Yon-Stevens, St Helena
That hurt: Graham reaches the top. Picture: Tina Yon-Stevens

The previous record was 5 minutes 17 seconds.

And island resident Martin Squibbs set a new record for others to try to beat – five ascents of the Ladder (and four descents) in a time of one hour, 14 minutes and 4 seconds, with the clock running throughout.

Martin is an outdoor enthusiast who has made a practice of climbing the notorious flight of steps out of Jamestown at least twice a week.

He had previously managed three ascents in succession before deciding to set himself the five-climb challenge.

Charlotte Hubbard climbed three times.
Charlotte Hubbard climbed three times.

School student Charlotte Hubbard also completed three ascents, but her overall time was not recorded because organisers had not known in advance that she would do so.

Graham is a visiting consultant working for engineering firm Fairhurst, due to leave the island on 25 January 2013 after a two-week visit. He is a keen mountain biker.

He passed up on the technique used by most Ladder challengers, who use the wide handrails to pull themselves up, and instead pitched forward and placed both his hands and his feet on the steps, as though climbing a fireman’s ladder.

The same approach could be adopted by future runners – especially those with short arms.

Martin leads the way
Martin leads the way

In all, 24 people took part in the Ladder Challenge in aid of New Horizons youth centre – many of them members of the organisation. Chairman Derek Richards and his wife Linda joined the climb, as did manager Nick Stevens.

Ten-year-old Josh Benjamin managed the climb in 9 minutes and 28 seconds, six seconds faster than Aiden Yon-Stevens – Nick’s son – who was the youngest challenger, aged just seven.

Every participant was asked to raise at least £5 in sponsorship.

All pictures by Tina Yon-Stevens

LADDER FACTS

Each of the Ladder’s 699 steps is roughly 11 inches high and 11 inches deep, making an incline of about 1:1. But cruelly, it’s much steeper at the top.

There used to be 700 steps. The bottom one is now below ground.

Jacob’s Ladder was originally built as an inclined railway for hauling animal dung and guano out of Jamestown, and to lower fresh produce into the town. Construction was supervised by Lieutenant G W Mellis during the governorship of Brigadier-General Dallas. Trucks were pulled by ropes linked to a capstan, powered by donkeys. The railway fell into ruin when the East India Company lost control of St Helena.

Island children learned to slide down the rails of the ladder, extending their arms along one rail and using their feet to brake against the other. It is said they carried hot food down to soldiers, on their stomachs.

The original Jacob’s Ladder appears in the Book of Genesis in the Holy Bible. It led to Heaven. The St Helena Jacob’s Ladder leads somewhere else.

Several other places around the world have flights of steps called Jacob’s Ladder. They are found in the UK at Sidmouth, Cheddar Gorge and the iconic Kinder Scout hill, and in Massachusetts (USA), Auckland (New Zealand) and Perth (Australia).

Andrew Gurr, governor from 2007 to 2011, climbed the Ladder regularly. He invited islanders to join him on his hundredth ascent, and many did.

Ladder challenges are staged every two years as the final event in the St Helena Festival of Running. If it was the first event, runners would suffer “ladder legs” and be unable to manage the run up Diana’s Peak.

Records are now kept of the fastest ascent times, but they do not include the results of a challenge staged for the first Governor’s Cup yacht race carnival in 1996. For the record, a yachtie from New Caledonia won a crate of beer for running up in 5 mins, 33 secs. Second place – and no beer – went to the future editor of St Helena Online, with a time of 5 mins 45.12 secs. Chris, a UK half-Saint from Portsmouth, was third in 5.52.

Matty John, a legendary squeezebox player in the mid 20th Century, would climb the Ladder every Saturday night after sessions in the White Horse. Once, near the top, he fell, but was saved when his braces got snagged. He was spotted by an inmate in the prison below, and rescued.

When first-time climbers think they’re half way up the Ladder, they’re not.

Twenty four people took part in the Ladder Challenge on 21 January 2013. With the eight ascents completed by Martin Squibbs and Charlotte Hubbard, the total number of steps climbed was 20,970.

For more Jacob’s Ladder facts, visit John Turner’s St Helena website

SEE ALSO:
Henrietta says island running is ‘spectacular’

Facebook