St Helena Online

Tag: Friends of St Helena

AUDIO: new St Helena Britannica is a tribute to island historian

Alexander Schulenburg presents Elisabeth Hearl with the first copy of St Helena Britannica
Alexander Schulenburg presents Elisabeth Hearl with the first copy of St Helena Britannica

The widow of the late St Helena historian, Trevor Hearl, has been presented with the first copy of a new book that brings together the results of his research over many years.

Click here to listen to Simon Pipe’s report from the launch

St Helena Britannica – Studies in South Atlantic Island History is published by the Friends of St Helena and was launched at the group’s annual meeting in Oxford on 8 June 2013. 

St Helena Britannica - selling well
St Helena Britannica – selling well

Another island scholar, Dr Alexander Schulenburg, has edited the book  into 30 chapters, beginning with the island’s first discovery and the mystique that grew up around it:

“As news of its existence permeated the ports, cities and centres of learning of Europe, the island gained an almost magical reputation from mariners’ yarns which, unlike the sightings of sea monsters in the encircling ocean, needed little enhancement from their imagination.”

St Helena Britannica can be bought for £25 from Ian Mathieson of the Miles Apart bookshop. Read more on the Friends of St Helena website. 

 

What the nurse said to the governor: Andrew Gurr looks back

When Andrew Gurr arrived on St Helena in 2007 as the first governor to be appointed through open competition, he found an island civil service that was financially adrift. It needed to undergo surgery – and so, later on, did Mr Gurr himself. In the fourth and final extract of an address to the Friends of St Helena, he reflects on changes made in his four years living in the governor’s mansion, and on some of the possibilities for the future – including a boarding school for rich South Africans, and even a space station. 

See also parts one, two and three.

On government accounting

During my time we made some important changes. The accounting system was really pretty awful: good, old-fashioned Victorian accounting. Cash accounting – penny in, penny out. No concept of time in the management of money throughout the whole civil service.

And over the last four years we put in accrual accounting.

[St Helena Online note: cash accounting records transactions only when money actually comes in or goes out. But many deals – including DfID funding – involve payments in the future. Accrual accounting includes these future payments (in and out) to give a better picture of finances. It is complex and costly to set up, but is used by nearly all but the smallest businesses].

The Foreign Office said it was not worth doing, but then, they said that in the Falklands but we did it in the Falklands and it undoubtedly was worth doing. It improves your management of funds and it means people begin to develop an awareness of the value of money over time, which is very very significant if you are going to manage it.

On media

We put in place a plan for re-aligning the media. That’s still going on, isn’t it?

The silly situation was we had two media organisations and the government was funding both, and it really wasn’t necessary.

Okay, we weren’t funding the Independent to the same extent we were funding the Herald, but councillors were getting increasingly restless, as indeed DfID was, about the fact that the two papers were so similar – and the two radio stations were so similar.

So that, I think, has been dealt with.

[St Helena Online note: Mike Olsson, who oversees both the St Helena Independent and Saint FM radio station, insists that the newspaper received no subsidy, though some content was directly funded. The St Helena Herald closed in March and was replaced in the same month by the government-funded Sentinel, which – unlike the Herald – was allowed to compete with the privately-owned Independent for advertising. Since Mr Gurr gave his talk, Mike Olsson has applied to run further radio stations in competition with three being set up by the St Helena Broadcasting Corporation, which publishes The Sentinel].

On advisers’ reports

Reports are difficult, because a consultant can come and make recommendations and then we will say to DfID, “Okay, let’s have the money to put this into practice.” “Oh, we haven’t got the money.”

About half of them, I would say, you cannot take forward because you haven’t got the resources to take forward what the consultant might be recommending, or you have to wait to do it.

And as I said when I talked about consultants, some are excellent, some aren’t. The ones who succeed are normally the ones you work with, so they leave behind people who have inculcated what they are saying and carry it forward. We don’t do enough about that: it’s a kind of, “the report is for DfID, not for St Helena” type of attitude.

It’s not a perfect situation, by any means.

On new economic opportunities

There are some very good ideas that have been around.

One, I think, is education: boarding schools for South African kids. A lot of people would like an English education for their children – people who live in South Africa. It would bring in staff, it would bring in activies, and that would be very good.

[There could be] all sorts of academic things – a marine laboratory, like what the Norwegians did with Spitzbergen, a coal mining island in the Arctic. It has become such a centre of excellence that it pays for itself.

On everyone knowing everyone… and what the nurse said to Mr Gurr

There are many things that St Helena is a good research environment for.

Not least is this non-anonymity thing. It astonishes me. People, when my grandfather was alive, if they had been to the next village they would stand in the village hall and tell everbody about it. It would be a big deal. It’s like that in St Helena still.

That lack of anonymity impacts on the police service, on the medical service. The nurse tending your bed when you’re sitting there in pain: you know her and you know her children and you know her way of life, and she knows you.

I went in for a rather nasty exploratory operation and the nurse said to me: “Don’t you worry, I see everything and I see nothing.” [laughter] I thought, that’s nice.

On Ascension as a space centre

An idea I touted round is Ascension as a space centre. If you are going to take off from a runway to get into space, which will happen, you have got to be near the equator because you have a better launch speed and it’s cheaper to get into orbit from the equator. And you have got to be somewhere that’s secure.

It seemed to me [Ascension is] the place where the West has the longest runway in the Southern Hemisphere, and it’s near the equator.

On exploiting isolation

St Helena has always paid its way when its isolation and position is worth something to somebody. Unless you major on that isolation as being the thing that is going to deliver, you are copying somewhere else that can do it cheaper. So you are looking for things that have that special characteristic.

On Plantation House

It’s iconic, isn’t it, Plantation?

I was looking at a country house and thought, “I wish I lived in a house like that – and I did! I had so much junk I could fill every room. I would say, “Do I mind living all by myself in a big house?” And I didn’t: it was really quite easy.

Having staff was a new experience for us. It’s not that easy. Suddenly the house isn’t just yours: there are people who think it’s theirs too. It’s their workplace and you have to take that into account every day.

The kitchen was a disgrace in my view – a health risk – and we had it refurbished into a modern kitchen.

On the late Bobby Robertson, councillor and fund-raiser

One of the great privileges of being governor is the entertaining. We had a dinner for Bobby Robertson and Dulcie on their 60th wedding anniversary and do you know, Bobby never said a word against me in council after that. It was one of the shrewdest dinners I ever gave.

On the late Sharon Wainwright
[Sharon was air access co-ordinator for St Helena; she died suddenly while in London, helping press the case for an airport, in August 2011]

She was a wonderful person to work with. I had a weekly chat with her: she was a great communicator and a very good man manager. She ran what she did well, she got things done – a priceless individual, sadly missed.

On the Friends of St Helena

Those people need the support here that you give them. They are very grateful for that. It’s very much in the interest of St Helena that this organisation, the Friends, exists.

On the future

We were trying, in our time, to move the island towards self-sufficiency and maintain the balance of interest. And it is about balance.

The situation is that the airport [contract] is signed, the ship’s capacity is being increased, there’s a sensible political structure, there’s better systems in the civil service. I think the private sector is getting increasingly engaged and people are getting excited about the airport.

Whether the future is bright or not I don’t know. I think it’s better, however you look at it, than the past; it’s better than it would have been but it’s still up to the Saints to grasp the opportunities that are there.

And they are there now, real opportunities, with – how many? – 170 people working on the airport or airport-related things. That will increase over the next few years.

Shelco are going to take a lot of people into that hotel and housing complex, so all that is going to be brighter, without any question.

On being remembered

Part of me says I would love people to say, “Well, he did a good job”, and part of me says, does it matter in the long run? I will just be a name on a wall or a fading photograph.

I enjoyed it. It was a tremendously enriching exerience and very colourful, and I will always have fond memories of it. But how people remember me depends on what people remember, and who’s telling them to remember it.

I loved the place, I love the people, but your time comes, you do your four years and you leave it. You have fond memories and life moves on.

(One or two of Andrew Gurr’s reflections from his talk to the Friends of St Helena in May 2012 have been kept back as stories in their own right, and will appear shortly. A gallery of his photographs may also appear soon).

SEE ALSO:

The inside story on St Helena, by former governor Andrew Gurr
Experts, expats and what England expects: a governor’s view, part 2
Civil service versus the can-do culture: a governor’s view

Media
Slavery
Foreign Secretary ‘wants hands-on help for islands’ – report

LINK:
Friends of St Helena

Civil service versus the can-do culture: a governor’s view

In the third extract of an address to the Friends of St Helena, former governor Andrew Gurr reflects on the island’s emerging private sector, optimism and – just briefly – education. Read part one of his recollections here, and find part two here.

On the private sector

You have the private-versus-public tension, which is always there: the cry from the private sector, “Why is the public sector doing this? Why can’t we do it?”

But what happens? Classic – we saw it with dustbin men on the Falklands, we saw it with quarries on St Helena. You privatise something and immediately they exploit their fellow islanders by putting the price up.

It’s one way, I would agree, of getting rid of inefficiency in the public sector, by putting it in the private sector, but it can be quite damaging. You have to be very careful in a small island that you don’t get monopolies that become exploitative of their fellow islanders.

On no-can-do attitudes

There’s also the civil service attitude against the private sector attitude. Having worked probably an equal time in both sectors, I’m well aware of this:  the civil service no-can-do, or “I will obey the rules and follow the system” attitude against the private sector, “Yes I will do it come hell or high water,” and those two attitudes are very different and they exist even on a small island.

“There’s also the pessimism against optimism tension.  Many local people are very good at being pessimistic: “It won’t work.” “Why not?” “Because we did it before and it didn’t work.” “And why not?”  “I don’t know – we never knew.” “It might work this time.” “Oh no, what a waste of time and money.”

That was so common. What about the space race? We would never have got into space if people hadn’t put up with failure amd gone and improved on it.

“Something gets condemned right at the beginning and you get the optimists who keep on  ploughing ahead and wasting money that is never going to work.

On transparency

There is also tension between freedom of information and the proper management of that information. If everybody  is going to know everything  about everything, which is the cry over here as well, that can be very difficult in some situations, and on a small island it’s even more difficult, because everybody knows everybody and everybody’s children are known by everybody else’s children.

That lack of anonymity is one of the biggest differences between St Helena and this country. You drop a clanger here and you go to the next village and nobody knows you dropped a clanger.

But you drop a clanger on St Helena and what do you do? Escape to the UK.

On the health service

Another big problem area – the health sector. The lack of medevac – how do you get off the island if you are really ill and the ship’s just left?

Generalists are very hard to get. The whole of the health sector specialises these days: general surgeons – how do you find them.

Some sophisticated medical equipment needs regular servicing. Is a man going to come at regular intervals. or do we train up somebody to do it? And if you train up someone good they have nothing to do for two thirds of the year. It’s very difficult to make that work.

The Falkands have any number of beds here in the NHS. St Helena has two a year.

I think expectations of the island are far too high. One has to look at where the island has come from over the last two years rather than look at the UK and try and catch up with it.

I think there is also sometimes on the island a good old-fashioned service level which doesn’t exist here [in the UK]. There are big advantages there as well as disasadvantages.

On education

The education sector: girls’ academic ability and development and their exam results are far better than the boys’. There seems to be a culture among the boys that they would much rather go to Ascension and become a fireman than learn something slightly more academic – without criticising firemen.

On farming and food

The boys don’t want to go out in the fields and work, so there are all those lovely fields out at Longwood that haven’t been used for years that could be, for arable or for farm animals.

And of course you’ve got the problem of the RMS and the fact that it’s heavily subsidised, so it’s cheap to import food on the RMS rather than make it yourself.

People say, “Yes, but look how we used to provide food for ships that called.”

Apparently, if you look in the archives it’s full of complaints from ship’s captains and pursers about the high cost of what the Saints were actually selling them. If we could get the equivalent money from ships today, then farming would probably pick up again.

On the RMS St Helena

There are so many interests conflicing on the route of the RMS. How do you handle that? Very difficult. You have workshops with peo0ple and try to make decisions to get the route optimal, but you have to have it either side of Christmas going back and forwards.

Do you bring back Namibia into the cycle or not? There are advantages of doing so and disadvantages of doing so. The price of beer goes up because all the cheapest beer comes from Namibia and what do you do about that? It very important to a lot of people.

It is hoped that part 4 of Andrew Gurr’s thoughts on St Helena will appear on this website over the weekend – breaking news stories permitting.

SEE ALSO:
The inside story on St Helena, by former governor Andrew Gurr
Experts, expats and what England expects: a governor’s view, part 2

Experts, expats and what England expects: a governor’s view, part 2

Andrew Gurr, immediate past governor of St Helena, has been sharing his insights from his recent four-year stint behind the big desk in The Castle in Jamestown. See part one of his talk to the Friends of St Helena here. In part two, below, he talks about attitudes to expats, experts, the Foreign and Commonwealth Office (FCO) and about his favourite adviser.

On Eddie Palmer of DFID

Probably the most valuable meeting of the week is the tele conference with London. That is a weekly hook-up for the governor and Eddie and Ernie. Ernie was the head of my governor’s office, a Foreign Office employee, and Eddie was the DFID representative on the island.

Eddie was my favourite adviser for all sorts of reasons (at this point, Mr Gurr broke off to general laughter and said to his wife in the audience: “Well, Jean, you are my favourite adviser, I hasten to add.”).

Eddie filled a big gap because DFID provided the money and Eddie understanding what was going on and influencing what was going on and being consulted on decisions was absolutely essential.

The need for a man in that role, or a woman, who is a shrewd political operator and understands the culture, is absolutely paramount. It will be a sad day for the island when Eddie finishes his long term, probably later this year.

So we had the three of us sitting round the phone on the island, and back in London you had both the Foreign Office and DFID people responsible, probably three or four of them.

When DfID was just across the park that was easy. they did it by week, one walked to one office and the other walked to the other one. Now the DFID overseas territory bit is right up in Scotland and they can’t do that and you have a very difficult three-way telephone link that doesn’t always work.

That was a vital weekly communication that I found extremely useful.

On FCO types

I was fortunate, I think, not to be an FCO person, for all sorts of reasons. I was recruited from outside. I was told no other governor had been recruited anywhere in that way. They had been appointed from outside but not through open competitive recruitment.

One finds with people who are in an organisation a long time, their loyalty is primarily to that organisation. I was able, I hope, to be loyal to the island every bit as much as I wouldbe loyal to my employer. Spanning that divide is quite important.

There is a conflict of interest, I think one has to admit it, between HMG [the UK government] and the island. The conflict is that HMG’s job is to fulfil international obligations at a minimal cost to the UK government, whereas the island wants to improve quality of life and maintain its culture, and those two things are not totally compatible. And all the time, the governor is spanning that conflict.

On FCO versus DFID

The other conflict is FCO and DFID. They are different types of people.

Generally speaking you join the Foreign Office because you want to see the world. If you speak to youngsters who are lining up in corridors for interview, that is generally what they want to do.

People join DFID because they want to help alleviate starvation in Africa. You get a different motivation in the staff. It’s a general rule and it doesn’t apply to everybody, but as a generality I think it’s a fair comment.

That translates itself into, let’s say, the talkers and the doers – you can see the difference – or the compromisers and the decision makers.

On bureaucracy

In my first year I was really taken aback by the fact that I was asked do my objectives. So I did my objectives and handed them in.

I think the Foreign Office were the first to send me a request for objectives. I sent the same set of objectives to DFID.

They said, ‘You can’t send us this, these are your Foreign Office objectives. I said ‘Yes, but I’m not going to change my objectives.’ And they said, ‘Never mind that, you have to do them in our format, in our way with our back-up papers.’

“This is ridiculous. Nobody should have two sets of objectives. That kind of thing does create a problem.”

On finance

There was quite a problem with the bank. Nobody owned the bank. When we came to look at the details of the bank and how we were going to run it, there were no shares that anybody owned. As a legal entity it has no ownership and the default is the government because the government would be lender of last resort.

We had to set up a structure whereby there was a proper form of ownership. It cleared up all sorts of problems which needn’t have existed.

On expats

Another problem is the Saints versus the expats. Or translated in the Falklands, the Falkland Islander against expats. The view of an expat from your average Saint of Falkland Islander is the three Ms: missionaries, mercenarys and misfits. I have to admit there’s something in that.

With all the conflicts you come across, this island against expert knowledge is always going to be there. Sometimes the islander is right and sometimes the expat is right, and it’s awfully difficult to make a judgment on that.

There is a wary envy of the expat. It’s entirely understandable.

On experts

Consultants and experts: you can get brilliant ones, and many of them are brilliant and  you can get one not so brilliant. It’s quite wrong of Saints to criticise all of them, which does happen, and it’s equally wrong to praise all of them. It has to be looked at against what they deliver.

There’s also a problem with the single consultant, because DFID has experts in each area – education, health, public works. One expert. So one expert comes to the island and writes a report that becomes DFID’s policy; that becomes absolutely the bible as far as DFID is concerned.

Imagine getting one economist to advise you on what’s happening to the Eurozone. Very often problems are like that. And that one expert can be wrong.

I would rather get people disagreeing in a room before one has to make a decision, rather than a single person giving a view. I think that is a big weakness of the present system.

On experts with doctorates

[Experts with doctorates – PhDs] are the most difficult people on Earth of work with.

We didn’t know what they didn’t know. They didn’t know what they did know, so they assumed other people knew what they knew and they couldn’t relate. Whereas the problem with islanders was that they didn’t know what they didn’t know, so they thought what they knew was what needed to be known, but there was other knowledge out there that didn’t need to be known. It was the reverse with the PhDs.

On the environment

Another area of tension is environment against development. How are you going to balance the genuine economic growth that is needed, against the wirebird, and against other invertebrates and goodness-knows-what that might be threatened?

I have been out there on Prosperous Bay Plain, in fact I was out there with the head of the Overseas Territories Department in the FCO when he visited, looking at the spiders in the dark and seeing this amazing display as their eyes light up as you shine a torch on them.

It’s fantastic and I wouldn’t want that to be damaged for anything, but compared with £20 million plus every year going out of the UK’s pocket to finance the island that’s got no chance of development without an airport, it’s got to be a no-contest.

This business of environment against development really does need a fair balance and a lot of work has been done by Shelco [the promoter of Wirebird Hills eco resort] on that.

On Shelco and the airport

During my time we made some important changes. The change process started. The fight for the airport; a very long, hard fight. Many of you [the Friends of St Helena] played a vital role in that here, and it was very important because the fight really was here for a long time.

Keeping Shelco interested: now they are interested, but there were several times when they nearly lost interest and one had to really cajole them to come back on board with their significant interest.

Part 3 of Andrew Gurrs thoughts on St Helena will appear on this website on Sunday 10 June 2012

SEE ALSO:
The inside story on St Helena, by former governor Andrew Gurr
Planning board backs eco resort – but Governor has final say

Communist Tristan da Cunha? That’s like waving a red flag…

The potato patches aren’t exactly a gulag, and the closest similarity to the Berlin Wall is that its buildings get blown down in storms… but Tristan da Cunha has been described, by its former governor, as a communist state. In the nicest possible way, of course.

Andrew Gurr was paying a compliment to the 260-or-so people of the world’s most remote inhabited island when he made his observation, but it’s raised the eyebrows of one seasoned Tristan watcher.

Mr Gurr told this site: “Tristan is a successful example of communism and I really stand by that.

“I think that for me, they just pull together in a way you wouldn’t expect in a society that was much bigger.”

His original comments can be seen here, in a transcript from his talk in Oxford in May 2012 to the Friends of St Helena.

A reader has responded by quoting Wikipedia:

“Communism is a revolutionary socialist movement to create a classless, moneyless, and stateless social order structured upon common ownership of the means of production.”

Leaving aside the bit about money, it’s that common-ownership bit that spoils the analogy, says our reader:

“While Tristan has a great deal of communal ownership, and everyone is pretty much provided for equally, the primary means of production is the fish factory… which is owned by a South African company.”

SEE ALSO:
The inside story on St Helena, by former governor Andrew Gurr
Tristan’s ‘Mr Fix-It’ turns 65 – but will Joe really retire?


The inside story on St Helena, by former governor Andrew Gurr

While cabinet minister Andrew Mitchell was in Swindolena in May 2012, telling Saints about their island’s bright opportunities, Andrew Gurr was just 30 miles away in Oxford, sharing insights from his four years as governor (2007-2011). The two men were speaking at exactly the same time.

A recording of Mr Gurr’s talk has now been passed to St Helena Online, with some parts removed to avoid offending individuals. Here are some of the insights he offered, as he delivered them at the annual meeting of the Friends of St Helena. More will follow in coming days.

On the Foreign Office

It is a fascinating place to visit. I got a bit fed up with it but there’s some interesting rooms there. One of the most fascinating is a small oval room. During most of my time as governor it was the room in which the junior ministers with specific responsibility for British overseas territories had their office. In prior times the whole of India had been run from that room, so quite an amazing place.

On Mrs Gurr

It’s a great privilege being a governor. I must pay tribute to my wife right at the beginning. Being a governor’s wife is, believe me, quite difficult. A governor’s wife does all sorts of interesting things. She feeds another stream of information into one’s reserves of information about the government that you would not otherwise get, and I felt sorry for my predecessor, who wasn’t accompanied by his wife, for that reason. Being a governor’s wife is a full time job, absolutely unpaid.

On the islands

Being governor seems to me to be different, depending on the territory. The whole role changes. We were in the Falklands for five years, where I was chief executive. When the governor was away I acted as governor.  That added up to over 12 months, so I had a rough idea of what being a governor was about.

I believe when I went to St Helena the governor had considerably more power and influence than they had when I left the Falklands. There are a number of reasons for that. Having three islands made life more complicated: three very different islands economically. St Helena was broke financially and needed a lot of help.

Ascension kind of covered its own costs because it was a dignified and souped-up labour camp, because you can’t really live there unless you are working there.

And Tristan da Cunha is absolutely unique. My conclusion, having been there, is that it is probably one of the few truly communist societies in the world that actually works. They really do work for each other and it is part of their whole psyche, and that’s terribly interesting.

Saints dominate St Helena and Ascension too, and increasingly they have a big influence on things in the Falklands, but the Falklands economically dominate the other islands because of the conflict of ’82 and the military and the squid money that flows, up to £30 million a year. And they have just had a very good year in the Falklands.

So there is a lot of inter-relationship between four very different islands, and as governor of three of them one has quite a complicated time.

On power

By power I mean influence, really, and trying to make things happen and indeed having the levers to pull to do that.

My predecessor Mike Clancy had been a chief secretary in a previous existence and I think it led him quite naturally to cover both roles.

There was a kind of vacuum where there wasn’t the duality that you would get, say, in a corporate organisation with a chairman – the governor – and the chief executive as main  operating officer.  That really didn’t exist, so I went into a situation on St Helena where the governor actually just jumped into a power vacuum.

Isolation of course helped that – or didn’t help it, depending on your point of view – but when your boss is 4,000 miles away and can’t get at you for at least three weeks, however he does it, you are on to a winner.

On democracy

I have to say that democracy was less  developed that it had become on the Falklands. The councillors, although they had democratic power, were more reticent to wield it. They had no control of real happenings; not in total, anyway. There was big area of the civil service over which they had very little influence indeed.

On the law

There are quite a few laws that are wildly out of date, and some that are quite different to UK laws and tailored to the island.

The governor is in the unviable position of presiding over a legal system that does not have equality of arms in the court room, and there’s very little one can do about that because there is no private sector solicitor on the island, so who is going to defend those who are being prosecuted by the government?

The answer is the lay advocates, and the lay advocates are trained and managed by the public solicitor. The public solicitor is a government appointment; the public solicitor reports to the governor and so does the Attorney General.

So you have this rather unequal combat in a courtroom with lay people defending, professional QCs [barristers] prosecuting and the governor somehow in the middle if there is a problem with that; but not directly in the middle because a lot of the reporting from the legal side is done informallyand certainly very effectively.

I praise all the public solicitors I dealt with. Neil Davidson and the new one, Debbie, are both tremendous and do a great job with the lay advocates.

(Mr Gurr told St Helena Online: “I would be full of praise for those who acted as lay advocates, but the fact remains that you have a QC prosecuting and an amateur defending, and under anybody’s judgment that is not a fair position. I don’t know how you solve it: you can’t spend money.”

On recruitment

There’s a recruitment problem. The governor is responsible for individual appointments  and sackings – not many – on the civil service.

Imagine trying to recruit doctors and nurses from that distance. Believe me,  interviewing over a jumpy video link is really not a good thing. On meeting them on island, you don’t recognise them at all – they look nothing like they do on the screen.

On the missing population

One of the big problems, thinking about the people in the civil service and the private sector, is a lack of middle managemen;  indeed, the lack of middle, because demographically, half of the population who should be there between the ages of 20 and 40 are somewhere else – they are here [in the UK], on the Falklands, or on Ascension.

Tose are years when you generate wealth, when you breed children and they are mising and that core of the population of St Helena not being there puts it out of balance.

That’s one of the big things about the airport, sucking people back in, to get back to a demographically balanced picture on the island.

On advisory group

When I got [to St Helena] there had been a lot of criticism about a group called the management team, because it was accused of making decisions, which was unconstitutional, so we disbanded it.

A clamour of public opinion was reacted to and I formed what I called the governor’s advisory group, which was more flexible.

On women

One of the things that astonished me… I looked round my advisers and nearly all of them were female, and it really says a great deal about the island and the ability of the ladies to get through the work. They are very competent.

I have to say it, that the men aren’t as competent generally. I hate to say it. I wish they were. There was something of the same on the Falklands – not as much as on St Helena.

It’s partly to do with schooling and culture and all sorts of things but it’s an interesting observation.

(In a separate conversation, Mr Gurr said: “I think it makes a nonsense of the Commonwealth people coming and talking about how we have to help girls. They are in charge.”)

SEE ALSO:
What really swung the airport deal (it’s not what you think)
Facebook page calls for more open government
AUDIO: DfID Secretary on island’s “brilliant opportunity”

LINK:
Friends of St Helena

Museum celebrates 10 years on St Helena Day (with audio)

Copy of advertisement for the museum's tenth birthdaySt Helena Day 2012 was celebrated with the first firework display the island had seen in ten years. But a decade earlier – on the 500th anniversary of the island’s discovery – it was marked with an even more significant event: the opening of its museum.

It was the result of an enormous logistical challenge, with a designer on the island having to liaise with the Friends of St Helena in the UK.

Museum logo: a big red M with silhouette family figures holding hands underneathClick here to listen to the story behind the museum

Edward Baldwin, who acted as the UK contact, said: “We were relying very heavily on a very slow internet.

“I would get home of an evening, set my dial-up internet to download the designs and whatever was being sent form the island. Two hours later I could start editing the files and leave them to upload overnight, and I did that night after night after night in the main design period.”

As with so many projects on St Helena, getting materials to the island was a significant headache, said Edward.

Screen grab, museum website homepage
Visit the museum online at museumofsainthelena.org

“The showcases were built on the island by a local carpenter but we ordered steel fronts for them with laminated glass, which were shipped out from the UK.

“A couple of the crates broke loose in the hold of the ship in bad weather and a lot of the glass arrived cracked, and much of it was unusable.

“We had enough fittings but not enough glass, and a complete set of new glass had to be shipped out. Needless to say, it didn’t arrive in time for the opening.

“We are still working on changing glass because it is incredibly difficult to get the old glass out of these steel frames. Ten years on there are still frames with cracked glass.”

Tessa Smith, whose husband was chairman of the Friends of St Helena, was one of an army of volunteers who worked to get the new museum ready for its opening.

“We just used to go down every day and say, ‘Who wants what done?’

“I was painting at half past ten the night before the opening, and hoping it dried overnight.

“Everybody was excited. The speeches went on and on and on.

“What we have heard since is that many people who know museums say this is as good as many museums all over the world.”

Pat Reynolds, who runs heritage services in Surrey, in the UK, visited the island as a tourist. She said: “I was really, really impressed. It’s built with design values and the quality of interpretation one would expect in Britain that one would expect from a new-build county museum – and it’s in a place that’s like an English parish.

“The museum in St Helena has achieved the really difficult balance between the people who know the place intimately and know its story, and the people like me drifting by for a few days. It has to tell the story of St Helena to people like me who drift in and to St Helenians, and I think it achieves that magnificently.

“The care for users of all ages is very evident. I was very impressed with what I saw about how the museum works with the community.”

Asked what could be done to improve the museum, Pat said: “I would look at its shop. I think it could do more to work with local producers to create more for the tourists to buy and take away.”

The tenth anniversary was due to be celebrated with a programme of video screenings.

AUDIO:
St Helena Museum: 10th anniversary (interview)

LINKS:
Museum of St Helena
Friends of St Helena

Facebook